GOALS

History 25CH is designed to enable you to meet the following learning outcomes. In other words, at the end of the semester––when you have successfully completed this class––your collected coursework will demonstrate all the skills and understandings listed below. What these skills and understandings look like in your work—or the criteria I’ll use to note when and how each is being met—are also listed.

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1. EXPLAIN the proliferation of movements justice led by communities of color in the Cold War United States, with an awareness of the events, contexts, and systems shaping this history.

What does this look like?

  • Comprehend the historical experiences of “nonwhite” people as presented in readings, historical documents, and lectures.
  • Identify key arguments, analyses, conclusions, and sources of evidence used by historians in their depictions of this history.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways race, gender, and class shape lived experiences in the United States, and how these have changed over time.

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2. ANALYZE the meaning and significance of historical primary sources related to movements for justice.

What does this look like?

  • Identify the purpose and perspective of historical primary source documents.
  • Interpret historical documents from within the context of their production, as a way of formulating meaning and conclusions relating to the past.
  • Assess diverse perspectives from an empathic and critical position.
  • Evaluate historical documents for their ability to illuminate the past, with a critical awareness of their limits and biases.

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3. APPLY historical research skills in an examination of the meaning and significance of justice movements led by communities of color.

What does this look like?

  • Identify historical primary sources related to movements for racial justice in the Cold War United States.
  • Identify historical secondary sources to support an analysis of primary documents from within the context of their production.
  • Analyze primary documents, framing a comparison between at least two distinct movements for racial justice.
  • Present an evidence-based narrative, reflecting radically-accessible diction and syntax, that teaches others about the past.

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