Posted by: profe | March 3, 2015

DISCUSSION: Haney López, intro and chs. 1-4

If you were not selected to “Discuss” or “Question” in this week’s in-class discussion then you are expected to “Comment” on this post. Please post your comment, relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion, below.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, March 4th at 9:35 a.m. PST.

Posted by: profe | February 27, 2015

WEEK 07: Chicano!

This week we move on to our investigation of the Chicano student movement. We’ll begin that process by starting on our second course book–Racism on Trial, by Ian F. Haney-López. Lopez is a legal scholar and one of the major forces within “Latino Critical Race Theory.” His book is written is a very accessible way, and it tells a great story, too.

On Tuesday we will read the introduction and chapters 1-4 for our in-class collective discussion. Write your “prep sheet” based on this. After our discussion we’ll have a short lecture on Chicano/Latino politics (where we’ll even discuss the difference between those words).

On Thursday, we will have a lecture and set of activities related to the “Chicano Walkouts” of 1968. You are asked to read a document before coming to class, an LA Times article from spring 1968 that lists all the students demands related to the mass walkouts of the time. It’s provided to you as DCR 8.

Chicanas and Chicanos march against the Vietnam War in East Los Angeles (August 29, 1970)

You should also be moving forward on the first part of our semester project, as we discussed in class last week.

Posted by: profe | February 24, 2015

DISCUSSION: Black Panthers

If you were not selected to “Discuss” or “Question” in this week’s in-class discussion then you are expected to “Comment” on this post. Please post your comment, relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion, below.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, February 25th at 9:35 a.m. PST.

You might also find this recent New York Times opinion piece useful. It discusses the history of lynching in the US, in particular targeting African Americans and Mexican Americans.

Posted by: profe | February 21, 2015

WEEK 6: Black Panthers and the UFW

We begin our first of three topic transitions this week as we move from the Black Freedom Struggle to the farmworker and Chicano/Latino movements. This doesn’t mean we leave our discussion of African American movements behind.  One of the fundamental arguments of our class relates to the interrelatedness of the movements we discuss and the potential for understanding when we examine them in concert with one another.

To begin to suggest that interrelatedness, we’ll be reading and writing about one topic this week while also learning about another. On TUESDAY we’ll read selected chapters from the book Black Against Empire, provided to you as DCR 06. As we mentioned in class, this is a new book that is the first comprehensive history of the Black Panther Party. The Black Panthers are an important organization for our class, inspiring countless other radical movements in the era. We’ll discuss the reading in our regular collective discussion. As usual, write your “prep sheet” related to it an in anticipation of being selected to participate in the seminar.

We’ll follow-up our in-class discussion with a lecture on Mexican American history, leading up to the story of Cesar Chavez and the United Farmworkers movement.

On THURSDAY we will continue our discussion of the UFW. If you have time, you are expected to watch the documentary “The Fight in the Fields,” available via Youtube. It’s not a big deal if you watch it after class because you also have your second Critical Evaluation exercise (CE2) due in class.  This is a 2-3 page interpretation of the primary source provided to you as DCR 07.  The document is a speech by Malcolm X titled “The Ballot or the Bullet.”

Now also might be a good time to start thinking about our semester project, “Teaching the Freedom Struggle.” The first part of our project will be due on Thursday, March 12th. A detailed assignment sheet for the entire project can be downloaded on our Assignments page, along with other resources to guide your thinking. The key at this stage will be finding and selecting a usable historical primary source that you will teach as part of your project. Finding primary sources takes time, so please start now.

MalcolmX

Posted by: profe | February 17, 2015

Discussion Post: Garrow

If you were not selected to “Discuss” or “Question” in this week’s in-class discussion then you are expected to “Comment” on this post. Please post your comment, relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion, below.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, February 18th at 9:35 a.m. PST.

Also, you might find this story interesting. It relates to a present-day attempt to possibly prosecute a horrific race crime that remains “unsolved” but whose perpetrators may still be alive.

Posted by: profe | February 13, 2015

WEEK 5: SNCC, Malcolm, and the Panthers

This week we will delve further into the history of SNCC, as we also introduce “black nationalism” and the late-sixties turn toward revolutionary politics.

On Tuesday we’ll read a chapter from the Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of King, Bearing the Cross. That reading is provided to you as DCR05. It’s related to events we’ve discussed and read about in other ways, but it will provide an interesting vantage point on the relationship between King, the movement, and the White House. You should write your “prep sheet” related to this chapter.

We’ll be able to discuss this reading as well as last week’s source, “Letter From a Birmingham Jail.” To add to that, we will also watch and discuss the film “Freedom on My Mind.” To watch the film

  1. login to your personal Sakai account;
  2. select the tab for our class (CH HIST 25.1 SP15);
  3. on the left sidebar of the class page menu click “Video Playlist”;
  4. and then access the film by clicking on our playlist.

The film should play directly in the Sakai window.

On Thursday we will have a lecture on “radicalism” as we also look at some primary sources (to be handed out in class).

MalcolmX

Posted by: profe | February 10, 2015

Discussion Post: “March (Book One)”

If you were not selected to “Discuss” or “Question” in this week’s in-class discussion then you are expected to “Comment” on this post. Please post your comment, relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion, below.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, February 11th at 9:35 a.m. PST.

Posted by: profe | February 5, 2015

WEEK 4: MLK, CORE, and SNCC

This week we’ll discuss the life and career of Martin Luther King Jr. within the context of how “movement history” is constructed. We’ll also begin our study of the youth-led movements of the early Sixties, in particular the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, better known as SNCC (pronounced “Snick”).

On Tuesday we’ll have our regular, in-class collective discussion on an interesting (and slightly different) reading assignment. We’re reading March (Book One), a graphic novel written by John Lewis, the legendary politician who is also one of the founders of SNCC.  This comic book is his attempt to provide the same kind of accessible version of his life story that MLK did back in the 1950s. Your “prep sheet” should be written related to Lewis’ book.

For Tuesday’s class you are also expected to watch a documentary called “Freedom Riders.” It tells the thrilling story of youth activists and their bold attempt to desegregate the interstate bus system. To watch the film:

1.  login to your personal Sakai account;
2. select the tab for our class (CH HIST 25.1 SP15);
3. on the left sidebar of the class page menu click “Video Playlist”;
4. and then access the film by clicking on our playlist.

The film will play directly in the Sakai window. You will have to be on a Claremont Colleges network to view the film. If you have further problems, read the Video 47 instructions.

On Thursday we’ll have a longer lecture and a less formal discussion on another digital reading–“Letter From a Birmingham Jail,” by Martin Luther King Jr.  The post is available online.

Have a great weekend!

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Posted by: profe | February 3, 2015

Discussion Post: ROBINSON, chs. 1-6

If you were selected to serve as a “Commentator” for this week’s discussion then you are expected to post a comment below relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, February 4th at 9:35 a.m. PST.

Posted by: profe | January 30, 2015

WEEK 03

This week is all about the Montgomery bus boycott as we begin reading our first course book–The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Women Who Started It, by Jo Ann Gibson Robinson–and watch part of an episode of the famed PBS documentary Eyes on the Prize.

On Tuesday we will have our second collective discussion on chapters 1-6 in the book The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Women Who Started It. As I mentioned in class, this is not a scholarly text but it is as rich as any you will read on the movement. With first-hand details about the organizing effort behind this famous historical event, Robinson gives us an important perspective from which to learn about the successes of the freedom struggle. Be mindful of the ways it informs your understanding of the difference between “organizing” and “mobilizing” as well as our very sense of what constitutes a “movement.”

As always, come to class with your one-page “prep sheet.”

On Thursday we will watch part of a documentary related to the bus boycott. We’ll also get a chance to discuss how this major event is remembered differently from our various sources. To prepare, I ask that you read the few remaining chapters in the Robinson book, chapters 7-9.

421px-Rosaparks

Rosa Parks, circa 1956.

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