Posted by: profe | April 24, 2015

WEEK 15

Look at that! All of a sudden we are staring down the last full week of the semester. This week is our last week of readings, our last week of prep sheets, and  our last week of in-class discussions. [You can pause now to weep.]

We still have one exciting (and full) week to get through before we cross that finish line next week. This Tuesday we will read just a bit more (chapters 5-7) in the book Rethinking the Asian American Movement and an article on the Third World Women’s Alliance. That piece is provided to you as DCR 15. We will use both of the readings in an in-class discussion, followed by a short lecture.

For Thursday we have our final course reading: James Baldwin’s famous 1963 letter to his nephew, “My Dungeon Shook.” It is from Baldwin’s powerful book The Fire Next Time, and it is provided to you as DCR 16. We will use it to have an open class discussion on some of the persistent themes of our class. We’ll close out the day with a final mini-lecture

I want to also draw your attention to the assignment sheet for the semester-long class project. A detailed description of Part 3 can be found there. Resources to help you with that assignment can be found here, here, and even here. (These links are all the same links from the original assignment description above.)

Posted by: profe | April 21, 2015

DISCUSSION: Maeda, chs. 3-4

If you were not selected in this week’s in-class discussion then you are expected to “Comment” on this post. Please post your comment, relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion, below.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, April 22nd at 9:35 a.m. PST.

Posted by: profe | April 19, 2015

WEEK 14

The end is near! This week we continue our class story and take a big step forward with our semester research project.

On Tuesday we will read chapters 3 and 4 in the book by Daryl Maeda and write a “prep sheet” on it. As always, we’ll have a collaborative discussion on the assignment in class. Come prepared to talk! We’ll follow up the discussion with a short lecture and activity on “Third World” movements in the US.

On Thursday we will have a lecture on the Vietnam War. You will also turn in the next part of your “Teaching the Freedom Struggle” project.

The Teaching Narrative is worth 20 final grade points. As we discussed in class, you should approach this assignment as a prolonged Critical Evaluation exercise. The main goal is to work with the primary historical source you have chosen and 1) describe it (What does it say?); 2) interpret it (What does it mean?); and analyze it (What is significant about it?). Using it to illuminate a question about the past and let the answer to that question be the thesis argument of your essay. Use your secondary sources (books and articles) to flesh out the context and tell the larger story that informs your analysis. You should view 8-10 pages as your upward limit. The assignment must use footnotes.

Posted by: profe | April 14, 2015

DISCUSSION: Maeda, intro and chs. 1-2

If you were not selected in this week’s in-class discussion then you are expected to “Comment” on this post. Please post your comment, relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion, below.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, April 15th at 9:35 a.m. PST.

Posted by: profe | April 13, 2015

WEEK 13

We begin our final class transition this week as we move to examine Asian American movements for change.

On Tuesday I will give you a brief overview of the scholarly field with respect to Asian Americans and some the significant themes of our class. We will also have a collaborative discussion on the course readings, the introduction and chapters 1-2 in our final course book Rethinking the Asian American Movement, by Daryl Joji Maeda. As you write your “prep sheet” for our in-class discussion it might be useful to begin the work of “thinking big” to forge some larger class conclusions through your examination of the Asian American movement.

On Thursday we will not have class because I am attending the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies (NACCS) conference.

The second part of your semester project is due in class on Thursday, Aril 23. As we discussed in class, ignore the original class prompt and instead approach the assignment as a prolonged Critical Evaluation exercise. The central part of your writing is describing (What does it say?), interpreting (What does it mean?), and analyzing (What is significant about it?) the primary historical source you have chosen, using it to illuminate a question about the past. As you do so, you must use your secondary sources (books and articles) to flesh out the context and tell the larger story. You should view 8-10 pages as your upward limit. The assignment must use footnotes.

Posted by: profe | April 7, 2015

DISCUSSION: Peltier

If you were not selected to “Discuss” or “Question” in this week’s in-class discussion then you are expected to “Comment” on this post. Please post your comment, relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion, below.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, April 8th at 9:35 a.m. PST.

Posted by: profe | April 3, 2015

WEEK 12

We’re almost at the end of our semester together! Before we get there we’ll have a few more miles of the journey to complete. Stay focused on the road ahead. The finish line will come soon enough.

For Tuesday we will READ part IV of the book Prison Writings: My Life is a Sun Dance, by Leonard Peltier. (It is provided to you as DCR 14.) Very few people are more associated with the term “political prisoner” than is Peltier. He is also an important figure in the evolving narrative of our class, made all more so by the fact of his imprisonment since 1977. Peltier has now spent more than half of his life in a federal penitentiary. Before you do the reading, I ask that you do some research on who Peltier is, the conditions and controversies of his imprisonment, and the historic movement to see him released. As always, come to class prepared to discuss the readings, with your “prep sheet” printed out. We’ll follow up our discussion with a short lecture.

On Thursday we will discuss the history of F.B.I. surveillance and “counterinsurgency” during the era. You are expected to read/watch/listen to two online pieces. The first is an article from the NY Times called “Burglars Who Took on F.B.I.,” which can be found here. A short mini-documentary accompanies the piece. I also ask that you listen to the audio story “Student ‘Subversives’ and the F.B.I.’s ‘Dirty Tricks’,” accessible online from NPR. We’ll use these to frame a class discussion on the topic, followed by a short lecture.

Posted by: profe | March 31, 2015

DISCUSSION: Wilkinson

If you were not selected to “Discuss” or “Question” in this week’s in-class discussion then you are expected to “Comment” on this post. Please post your comment, relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion, below.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, April 1st at 9:35 a.m. PST.

Posted by: profe | March 27, 2015

WEEK 11: Red Power

This week we will delve deeply into American Indian movements of the 60s and 70s. To begin our discussion on Tuesday, we have two readings on the history of the period. Both are chapters from the book Blood Struggle, by Charles Wilkinson. They are provided to you as DCR 11 and DCR 12. As always, type up and print out your “prep sheet” in relation to these chapters. Be especially mindful about creating questions that are answerable from the source and that will serve as useful points of discussion by the class.

On Thursday we will watch a documentary in class. “Alcatraz is Not An Island” is a film detailing the occupation of Alcatraz, in the San Francisco Bay. You also have a document to read–the “The Alcatraz Proclamation”–provided to you as DCR 13. I will also return your CE 3 assignments in Thursday’s class.

Posted by: profe | March 24, 2015

DISCUSSION: Palante!

If you were not selected to “Discuss” or “Question” in this week’s in-class discussion then you are expected to “Comment” on this post. Please post your comment, relating to the reading assignment and/or our in-class discussion, below.

Your comment is due no later than Wednesday, March 25th at 9:35 a.m. PST.

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